Photo of the Month

December 2009

Pictured above is our new Octavius from MenloSystems, a Ti:Sapphire octave spanning comb laser. The Octavius is the light source for a second Comb system, a technology we have applied to searches for habitable Earth-size extra-solar planets via precision astronomical spectroscopy. Our first Astro-comb system has been moved to the Whipple Observatory in Arizona and is used with the TRES spectrograph and a 60-inch optical telescope for the planet search mission. We are currently building the second astro-comb system in our laboratory at the CfA and will be used as a test-bed for understanding system stability and the study of additional frequency generation. More details on this long-running project can be found here
 

October 2009

In recent months, the open-access, low-field MRI system - built for posture-dependent lung imaging in the Walsworth Group laboratory - has been redesigned and upgraded signficantly. The imager previously seen here, has been relocated to the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital. Shown above is the imager in its new home; in addition to closer proximity to our medical collaborators, this new site has breathtaking views of Boston's inner harbor.  
 

July 2009

In recent months, the open-access, low-field MRI system - built for posture-dependent lung imaging in the Walsworth Group laboratory - has been redesigned and modified signficantly. The imager, previously seen here, is about to be relocated to theMartinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital. Shown above is half of the MRI magnet after the majority of the aluminum support flange has been cut away. Acrylic inserts have been fabricated to take the place of the aluminum flange, and allow the remaining parts of the imager (gradient coils, etc) to be bolted in place. Matt Rosen is shown checking the alignment of the first plastic insert and with the annular aluminum flange.  
 

May 2009

    

During the month of May, the open-access, low-field MRI system built for posture-dependent lung imaging in the Walsworth Group laboratory, will be undergoing some serious changes. The imager, previously seen here, is being dismantled prior to its relocation to the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital. During this time, a number of important design upgrades and modifications will also be carried out. Shown above is half of the MRI magnet while still on its frame, after the first coil and support flange had been removed. On the right, the second coil is slowly removed from the support flange.  
 

April 2009

    

At the beginning of the month, the 50th Experimental NMR Conference was held at its "spiritual home", the Asilomar Conference Grounds near Monterey in California. In a change from recent years, the poster exhibit was moved into an underground parking lot at the Asilomar site, removing the need for a large tent on the Asilomar grounds. The weather was clear and sunny, although a cold wind kept everyone on their toes. A special session on Tuesday afternoon commemorated the half-century of history of the conference, and recalled some of the most important presentations from the past. Ron was fortunate enough to have been invited to give a plenary talk on the latest results from the nitrogen-vacancy diamond magnetic-field sensing work. More news about the exciting nitrogen-vacancy diamond project can be found here
 

February 2009

In a spin-off from our silicon nanoparticle/molecular imaging project (in collaboration with the Marcus group from the Harvard Physics Department), we have begun testing the electron spin resonance properties of nanoparticles with metallic coatings. James McIver, a graduate student in the Marcus group, has been spending time in our lab developing a simple bench-top ESR system to begin these measurements. James is shown with his apparatus in the Walsworth group laboratories. More news about the exciting particle project can be found here